Warning: 90's Nostalgia Alert

Credit: Photo Creations by Cassie @photocreationsbycassie

Credit: Photo Creations by Cassie @photocreationsbycassie

More and more often, I'm seeing the fabulousness that was growing up in the 90s splashed across my Facebook newsfeed. Articles titled 'Only 90s Babies Will Remember These' and '18 Things Kids Who Grew Up in the 90s Will Remember' bombard me me almost more than Harry Potter and Doctor Who related posts. It seems like everywhere we go, nostalgia is right there, reminding us of an easier time, a time that the internet won't seem to let us move past.

Honestly, I'm more than okay with that.

Give me those mail-to-your-house boxes with Hey! Arnold tees and Reptar bars. Bring back 3D Doritos, Orbitz soda, Code Red Mountain Dew (am I the only one who thought that stuff was WAY better than just plain Mountain Dew?!), Lizzie Maguire, and those little plastic choker necklaces. I actually bought Dunkaroos off of Amazon within the last few years!

I don't think that anyone could ever refute the statement that 90s Nickelodeon was by and far the best era and channel for cartoons growing up. Sure, Disney had One Saturday Morning and Cartoon Network boasted shows such as the Powerpuff Girls and Ed, Edd and Eddy, but Nickelodeon had Doug, Rugrats, Rocko's Modern Life and so on.

Doug was so relatable. He was just this fourth grade kid, living in a new town, trying to impress the girl of his dreams by eating liver and onions and playing sweet jams on his banjo. Rugrats made us all believe that we were total badasses as babies, going on adventures around the house that seemed so far beyond us that as adults we can only laugh. I'm not really sure what drew me to Rocko's Modern Life (probably the same dumb concepts that drew me to Ren & Stimpy), but that was equally a great show, which has only gotten better with age as the inappropriate jokes make so much more sense now.

And maybe that's what was always so great about Nick cartoons. They were designed for a kid audience, but they didn't forget to add things in for the adults, too. Now, looking back on them, we remember the shows we grew up watching with fondness, and find a new love for them as we rediscover old jokes that once didn't make sense and now do.

ALEXA RAPACH